Traveling Withing the U.S. As an Undocumented Person

An Undocumented individual may travel within the United States and its territories without Advance Parole.

 

What constitutes as the United States and its Territories?

  • Continental United States and Alaska
  • It’s territories are:
    • Puerto Rico
    • Hawaii
    • U.S Virgin Islands
    • Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands
    • Guam
    • American Samoa*

 

There are 11 Islands and reefs claimed by the United States that are not inhabited that an Undocumented person or a DACA recipient cannot visit.  

 

As an Undocumented person (with our without DACA) you can travel all over the Continental United States and its territories*

 

*With the exception of American Samoa.  As a DACA Recipient or Undocumented person, you cannot travel to American Samoa (Source: USCIS.gov https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/1772/~/daca-approved-travel-to-u.s.-territories-without-advance-parole)

 

Traveling within the Continental United States:

 

  1. Traveling via airplane
    1. You may use a valid Driver’s License or State ID, however
      1. It is safer to carry your native Country’s Passport
      2. Carry your EAD (work permit) or a copy of (if available) your approval notice I-797 for both form I-821D (DACA) and its work permit form I-765, If you are a DACA Recipient.
      3. Those that are not DACA Recipients may also travel by airplane with their native Country’s Passport. If you have an AB 60 Driver’s License or it’s equivalent, it is not recommended to use it to travel since it is not a Federal form of Identification.
      4. If you have a “valid” ID or DL, it is recommended to use your native Country’s passport since some states and airports no longer honor the DL or State ID.
        1. Keep in mind that there is always a small risk of encountering Immigration officers on the airport, specially when entering the continental U.S. Always have an attorney’s number memorized.
  2. Traveling cross-country with a car
    1. Carry the same documents as stated above (DL, or ID or/and valid passport along with proof of your DACA status [if any])
    2. If traveling near a border (Canada or Mexico) avoid checkpoints (you must research the border by using Google for checkpoints)
    3. It is recommended not to drive 100 miles within the border.
      1. If you must drive to the border, reach your destination and try to use public transportation or Lyft for tourism.
    4. Be prepared to carry cash if driving cross-country since the majority of the roads have tolls that can range from three (3) Dollars up to thirty (30) Dollars.

Driving Towards the Mexican Border

    1. The States that border Mexico are the following:
      1. California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas

 

  • Border Patrol Checkpoints in the CA Border
  • San Clemente, CA I-5 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. The San Clemente Border Patrol Station maintains a full-time traffic checkpoint on the northbound lanes of I-5

 

  • Temecula, CA I-15 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Mile Marker 54 -Checks traffic going north on I-15. It is also right at the end of San Diego county going into Riverside county. Will also set up temporary stations on Rainbow Canyon Rd/CA 395.

 

  • Oak Grove CA – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Temporary checkpoint placed occasionally.  Placed near Oak Grove along Highway 79

 

  • Elmore Ranch, CA – Border Patrol Checkpoint Highway 86 CA

 

            1. Located near the intersection of Highway 78 and 86.  Checks Northbound traffic on Highway 86

 

  • Highway 86 CA – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Temporary Checkpoints are placed along Highway 86. Checks northbound traffic.

 

  • Highway 111 CA – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Temporary Border patrol checkpoints are placed along Highway 111. Checks northbound traffic.

 

  • Border Patrol Checkpoints in the AZ border
  • Fortuna Foothills, AZ I-8 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Mile Marker 17 – I-8.  Located 3 miles East of Fortuna Foothills.  Checks Eastbound traffic.Permanent Border Patrol Checkpoint,

 

  • Highway 95, AZ – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Highway 95 northbound. North of Kinter AZ

 

  • Stanwix, AZ I-8 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Mile marker 78, I-8.  11 miles west of Dateland AZ

 

  • Why, AZ – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. This checkpoint is located about 20 miles north of the US/Mexico border

 

  • Agua Linda, AZ 1-19 – Border Patrol Checkpoint, AZ, USA

 

            1. Temporary checkpoint placed at exit 42. This station is mobile and may move about I-19. Government has proposed a temporary checkpoint between Nogales and Tucson.

 

  • Whetstone AZ – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Located somewhere south of Whetstone AZ on Highway 90.

 

  • Border Patrol Checkpoints in the NM Border
  • I-25, NM – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Near Milepost 26. Checks all northbound traffic. Located 25 miles north of Las Cruces NM.

 

  • Border Patrol Checkpoints in the TX Border
  • Sierra Blanca, TX I-10 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Mile Marker 102 – I-10 Checks all Eastbound traffic. Five miles West of Sierra Blanca

 

  • Marfa, TX – Border patrol checkpoint

 

            1. South of Marfa TX on Highway 67. Checks all northbound traffic. Located north of Presidio/Ojinaga border

 

  • Marathon, TX – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Checks all northbound traffic on Highway 385. Located south of Marathon TX

 

  • Eagle Pass, TX – Border Patrol checkpoint

 

            1. HWY 57 North Eagle Pass, TX 78852

 

  • Laredo, TX I-35 – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Located 24 miles north of Laredo TX border. Checks all northbound traffic.

 

  • Falfurrias TX – Border Patrol Checkpoint

 

            1. Located near Falfurrias. Checks northbound traffic on Highway 281. There are temporary checkpoints placed south of this location. Between 25 – 75 north of the border.

 

  • Sarita Checkpoint

 

          1. Address. US 77; Sarita, Texas 78338.

 

Above information was found at https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1L872WkbWL11Zobsarita-E9Oyk_Zen1Ws&hl=en_US&ll=30.36332925760974%2C-107.83628500000003&z=5

For additional checkpoints please visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Border_Patrol_interior_checkpoints

There is a sad but starking difference between the Canadian Border and the Mexican Border. The Mexican Border is extremely regulated with various checkpoints, while the Canadian Border is for the most part unprotected except on the Port of Entries. There is one highway however on the Canadian side to watch out for:

  1. I-87 near North Hudson, 80 miles from the Canadian border in Upstate New York in Buffalo.
  2. Please check the following website for a list of the Canada-US Border Crossings
    1. Since the Canada Border is mostly “unprotected” it is sometimes easy to “accidentally” cross into the Maple Leaf Country, check out the following link for the Border Crossings and its associated highways. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Canada%E2%80%93United_States_border_crossings

Alaska

  1. If you are traveling to Alaska, make sure that you get a DIRECT flight to the state. DO NOT have layovers because then you will be touching foreign land and in order to board your second plane to Alaska you will have to show Legal Documents to re-enter the Country. You may also have layovers within the States, but keep in mind that if there is an emergency and the plane land in Canada, you will be in a situation.

If you are traveling to the territories, they are treated  as if you were traveling within the continental United States. Usually Puerto Rico and Hawaii are easier and often with no CBP inspection, but it can happen seldomly, many DACA Recipients and general Undocumented folk have traveled to these two (2) Islands without issues.

If you are traveling to the U.S Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands and Guam it is easier to be inspected, thus have your documents ready if you are a DACA Recipient. Although not a rule, those without DACA should be even more alert and careful, and the risk is higher if you travel to these territories.*

*Many individuals with DACA that have traveled to these territories reported that they were inspected.  These individuals were permitted to return to Continental U.S due to their DACA Work Permit. If you do not have a DACA Work Permit or TPS or under the protection of other program, keep in mind that there is a slight higher risk than Puerto Rico and Hawaii.

 

Have memorized an attorney’s number in case of immediate assistance.

 

 

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